Applying complexity theory for modeling human resource outcomes: Antecedent configurations indicating perceived location autonomy and work environment choice

April J. Spivack, Arch G. Woodside

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Who are the knowledge workers perceiving high versus low location autonomy? Do these workers consistently select work environments to enhance their well-being or to enhance their productivity? This study frames the causal conditions for answering these research questions in response to calls (Misangyi et al., 2017; Woodside, 2014) to embrace complexity theory in management research by constructing and testing asymmetric case-based models of decisions and outcomes. The present study examines propositions relating to knowledge worker's choices of work environments, including: P1: Knowledge workers high in intrinsic work motivation consistently select work environment choices to enhance productivity. P2: Knowledge workers with high scores in perceived location autonomy (PLA) consistently select work environments to enhance well-being and/or work productivity. The study includes examining these two and six additional propositions empirically using a sample of full-time professional knowledge workers. The findings deepen and expand on prior symmetric-based theory and analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalJournal of Business Research
Volume102
Pages (from-to)109-119
ISSN0148-2963
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 512 Business and Management
  • complexity
  • knowledge workers
  • intristic motivation
  • perceived location autonomy
  • work environment choice

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