Associations between five-factor model traits and perceived job strain: A population-based study

Maria Törnroos, Mirka Hintsanen, Taina Hintsa, Markus Jokela, Laura Pulkki-Råback, Nina Hutri-Kähönen, Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association between Five-Factor Model personality traits and perceived job strain. The sample consisted of 758 women and 614 men (aged 30-45 years in 2007) participating in the Young Finns study. Personality was assessed with the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) questionnaire and work stress according to Karasek's demand-control model of job strain. The associations between personality traits and job strain and its components were measured by linear regression analyses where the traits were first entered individually and then simultaneously. The results for the associations between individually entered personality traits showed that high neuroticism, low extraversion, low openness, low conscientiousness, and low agreeableness were associated with high job strain. High neuroticism, high openness, and low agreeableness were related to high demands, whereas high neuroticism, low extraversion, low openness, low conscientiousness, and low agreeableness were associated with low control. In the analyses for the simultaneously entered traits, high neuroticism, low openness, and low conscientiousness were associated with high job strain. In addition, high neuroticism was related to high demands and low control, whereas low extraversion was related to low demands and low control. Low openness and low conscientiousness were also related to low control. This study suggests that personality is related to perceived job strain. Perceptions of work stressors and decision latitude are not only indicators of structural aspects of work but also indicate that there are individual differences in how individuals experience their work environment.

Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalJournal of Occupational Health Psychology
Volume18
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)492-500
Number of pages9
ISSN1076-8998
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10.2013
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 314,1 Health care sciences
  • Five-Factor Model
  • Individual differences
  • Job strain
  • Personality
  • Work stress

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    Törnroos, M., Hintsanen, M., Hintsa, T., Jokela, M., Pulkki-Råback, L., Hutri-Kähönen, N., & Keltikangas-Järvinen, L. (2013). Associations between five-factor model traits and perceived job strain: A population-based study. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 18(4), 492-500. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0033987