From identity politics to the politics of power: Men, masculinities and transnational patriarchies in marketing and consumer research

Jeff Hearn, Wendy Hein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Despite increased interest in men and masculinities in marketing and consumer research (MCR), mainstream research has neglected feminist perspectives that engage with issues of gender power relations. In particular, critical studies of men and masculinities (CSMM), including concepts such as the hegemony of men, patriarchies, transnational patriarchies or simply transpatriarchies, are rarely theoretically or empirically developed. This chapter begins by highlighting the emergence of research on men and masculinities in MCR as based on images, representations and identities. This is followed by theoretical developments of CSMM, including the hegemony of men and transpatriarchies. We explain how these theories have appeared in recent research and how they can further impact change in relation to contemporary issues. This chapter then seeks to build on the momentum of recent feminist research efforts in MCR by calling out the more systematic gender power relations within the previously depoliticised research on men and masculinities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Companion to Feminism and Marketing
EditorsPauline MacLaren, Lorna Stevens, Olga Kravitz
Number of pages29
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Publication date2022
Pages138-156
ISBN (Print)9780367477578
Publication statusPublished - 2022
MoE publication typeA3 Book chapter

Keywords

  • 512 Business and Management
  • consumer culture theory
  • Consumer behaviour
  • marketing
  • gender
  • feminism
  • men
  • masculiniites
  • patriarchy

Areas of Strength and Areas of High Potential (AoS and AoHP)

  • AoS: Responsible organising

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