Institutionalisation and subjective wellbeing for old-age individuals: is life really miserable in care homes?

Petri Böckerman, Edvard Johansson, Samuli I. Saarni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper we examine whether there are systematic differences in the quality of life, depending on whether an individual is institutionalised or not, holding health status and income level constant. In doing this we use a nationally representative data set, the Health 2000 in Finland. When controlling for health and functional status, demographics and income level, we find that individuals who are living in old-age homes actually report significantly higher levels of subjective wellbeing than those who are living at home. We argue that this finding emerges from queuing for care homes. This implies that there are individuals living at home who are so frail that they should really be living in an old-age institution, but because of the queues for that particular mode of living, they are living at home with a decreased quality of life as a consequence.
Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalAgeing and Society
Volume32
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)1176–1192
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 511 Economics

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