Personality traits of the five-factor model are associated with effort-reward imbalance at work: A population-based study

Maria Törnroos, Mirka Hintsanen, Taina Hintsa, Markus Jokela, Laura Pulkki-Råback, Mika Kivimäki, Nina Hutri-Kähönen, Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the association between personality traits and work stress. METHODS: The sample comprised 757 women and 613 men (aged 30 to 45 years in 2007) participating in the Young Finns study. Personality was assessed with the NEO-FFI questionnaire and work stress according to Siegrist's effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model. RESULTS: High neuroticism, low extraversion, and low agreeableness were associated with high ERI. Low conscientiousness was associated with high ERI in men. No association was found between openness and ERI. High neuroticism, high extraversion, and low agreeableness were associated with high effort and low neuroticism, high extraversion, and high agreeableness with high rewards. High conscientiousness was associated with high effort, and in women, with high rewards. High openness was associated with high effort. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that personality traits may predispose to and protect from work stress.

Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume54
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)875-880
Number of pages6
ISSN1076-2752
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07.2012
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

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