Social media and hyper-masculine work cultures

Anna Maaranen*, Janne Tienari

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In this article, we aim to contribute to research on social media as an arena for gender relations and inequality by elucidating how social media and hyper‐masculine work cultures are interconnected. We focus empirically on the fiery social media commentary #MeToo sparked on Wall Street in New York. While the possibility of this movement backfiring has received relatively little research attention, we argue that online reactions illustrate the unpredictable nature of social media movements and their reception in organizations. Our analysis shows how they work to naturalize gender differences and polarize opinions, often with highly suspect humour. Focusing on interconnections of hyper‐masculine work cultures, on the one hand, and popular misogyny gaining ground online, on the other, offers ways to critically explore the constitutive role of social media as a medium in shaping contemporary workplaces and society. More research on social relations and technology is needed in organizations that are less obviously hyper‐masculine but deeply gendered nevertheless.
Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalGender, Work & Organization
Pages (from-to)1-18
ISSN0968-6673
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 08.04.2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 512 Business and Management
  • #MeToo
  • social media
  • Wall Street
  • backlash
  • gender equality
  • discourse

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