Studies of the seasonal pattern of multiple maternities

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The seasonality of population data has been of great interest in demographic studies. When seasonality is analyzed, the population at risk plays a central role. In a study of the monthly number of births and deaths, the population at risk is the product of the size of the population and the length of the month. Usually,
the population can be assumed to be constant, and consequently, the population at risk is proportional to the length of the month. Hence, the number of cases per day has to be analyzed. If one studies the seasonal variation in twin or multiple maternities, the population at risk is the total number of monthly
confinements, and the study should be based on the rates of the multiple maternities. Consequently, if one considers monthly twinning rates, the monthly number of birth data is eliminated and one obtains an unaffected seasonality measure of the twin maternities. The strength of the seasonality is measured by a chi-squared test or by the standard deviation. When seasonal models are applied, one must pay special attention to how well the model fits the data. If the goodness of fit is poor, it can erroneously result in a statement that the seasonality is slight, although the observed seasonal fluctuations are marked.
Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalTwin Research and Human Genetics
Volume20
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)250-256
Number of pages7
ISSN1832-4274
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05.2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 112 Statistics and probability
  • population at risk
  • chi-squared test
  • sinusoidalmodel
  • standard deviation
  • adjusted coefficient of determination
  • Denmark
  • Switzerland
  • the Åland Islands
  • Naples

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