The effect of exposure to bullying on turnover intentions: the role of perceived psychological contract violation and benevolent behaviour

Denise Salin, Guy Notelaers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study analyses the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and turnover intentions. We hypothesised that this relationship is mediated by perceptions of psychological contract violation, and that employee benevolence acts as a moderator. A survey design was employed and data were collected among business professionals (n = 1148). The analyses confirmed that perceived psychological contract violation partially explains the relationship between exposure to bullying and turnover intentions. The mediation process was stronger for those reporting more benevolent behaviour, suggesting that the importance of perceived psychological contract violation is greater among those scoring high on benevolent behaviour. The results also show that highly benevolent employees are more affected by exposure to bullying behaviour, although the effects were equally detrimental, irrespective of benevolent behaviour, when employees were exposed to very high levels of bullying. The study advances understanding of the mechanisms that govern outcomes of exposure to bullying, highlighting in particular the role of perceived psychological contract violation, and examining differences concerning high or low benevolence employees.
Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalWork & Stress
Volume31
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)355-374
Number of pages20
ISSN0267-8373
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26.05.2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 512 Business and Management
  • Bullying
  • Employee mistreatment
  • Harrassment
  • Psychological contract violation
  • Turnover intentions

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