Why do public policy-makers ignore marketing and consumer research? A case study of policy-making for alcohol advertising

Jaakko Aspara, Henrikki Tikkanen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Public policy-makers have been noted to sometimes ignore marketing/consumer research, even when the policy issue clearly pertains to consumption markets. We embark to identify factors that may explain policy-makers’ limited attention to marketing/consumer research, especially in cases related to consumer affairs that may have public health implications. Empirically, we focus on policy-making around the advertising of alcohol products. Having been involved in this policy-making process in Finland, we elucidate the case through an introspective narrative. We find that the factors explaining policy-makers’ limited attention to marketing/consumer research range from the decision-making characteristics of policy-makers, through inconsistent definitions for key terminology, to the fear of over-generalizing certain theories of marketing/consumer research. Regarding the latter, a key issue in the present case was that public policy-makers were unconvinced about the generic marketing theory stating that in mature markets, advertising will not increase the total consumption demand of a product category.
Original languageEnglish
Peer-reviewed scientific journalConsumption, Markets and Culture
Volume20
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)12-34
Number of pages23
ISSN1025-3866
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29.04.2016
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article - refereed

Keywords

  • 512 Business and Management
  • Alcohol advertising
  • alcohol regulation
  • advertising regulation
  • policy design
  • marketing research
  • adolescents
  • public policy-making
  • Business, Markets and Societal Dynamics

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